This site has limited support for your browser. We recommend switching to Edge, Chrome, Safari, or Firefox.

Questions? Call Us! (805) 232-4323

Use coupon code WELCOME10 for 10% off your first order.

Cart 0

Congratulations! Your order qualifies for free shipping You are $200 away from free shipping.
No more products available for purchase

Is this a gift?
Subtotal Free
Shipping, taxes, and discount codes are calculated at checkout

The History of the Jeep Wagoneer Cargo Area: From Wood Paneling to Modern Design

Dog in a Jeep Wagoneer

The Jeep Wagoneer is a legendary vehicle that has been around for over half a century. It has undergone several transformations over the years, but one of the most significant changes has been to its cargo area. From its early days with wood paneling to the modern designs of today, the Jeep Wagoneer cargo area has come a long way. In this blog post, we will take a trip down memory lane and explore the history of the Jeep Wagoneer cargo area, from its humble beginnings to its current state as a versatile and functional space.

The Evolution of the Jeep Wagoneer Cargo Area Design

The Jeep Wagoneer is a classic American SUV that has been in production since the 1960s. Over the years, the cargo area design of the Wagoneer has undergone several changes to meet the changing needs of consumers.

In the early years of production, the Wagoneer had a simple cargo area with a flat floor and fold-down rear seats. This design was practical for carrying large items, but it lacked versatility.

In the 1970s, Jeep introduced the Cherokee model, which featured a more versatile cargo area design. The Cherokee had a split-folding rear seat that allowed for different configurations of cargo space. This design was so popular that it was eventually incorporated into the Wagoneer.

In the 1980s, the Wagoneer received another update to its cargo area design. The rear seat was redesigned to fold completely flat, creating a large, level cargo area. This design was perfect for carrying large items like furniture or appliances.

Today, the Jeep Grand Wagoneer continues to feature a versatile cargo area design. The rear seats can be folded down to create a large, flat cargo area, or they can be left up to accommodate passengers.

The Role of Wood Paneling in the Jeep Wagoneer's History

One of the most iconic features of the Jeep Wagoneer is its wood paneling. This design element has been a part of the Wagoneer's history since the 1960s and has become synonymous with the classic American SUV.

The wood paneling on the Wagoneer was originally introduced as a way to make the vehicle look more upscale. At the time, wood paneling was a popular design element on luxury cars, and Jeep wanted to give the Wagoneer a similar look and feel.

Over the years, the wood paneling on the Wagoneer became more than just a design element. It became a symbol of the vehicle's ruggedness and durability. The wood paneling was made from real wood, which gave the Wagoneer a unique look and feel that couldn't be replicated by other SUVs.

Today, the wood paneling on the Jeep Grand Wagoneer is more of a nod to the vehicle's history than a functional design element. The paneling is made from a vinyl material that looks like wood, but doesn't require the same level of maintenance as real wood.

Despite the changes in the Wagoneer's design over the years, the wood paneling remains a beloved and iconic feature of this classic American SUV.

Jeep Wagoneer Cargo Area Features and Innovations

The Jeep Wagoneer was first introduced in 1963 and quickly became a popular choice for families and outdoor enthusiasts. One of the key features that set the Wagoneer apart from other vehicles of its time was its spacious cargo area. The Wagoneer's cargo area was designed to be versatile and functional, with features like fold-down rear seats, a removable tailgate, and a roof rack for carrying extra gear.

Over the years, the Wagoneer's cargo area continued to evolve and improve. In the 1970s, a power tailgate was added, making it easier to load and unload heavy items. In the 1980s, the Wagoneer's cargo area was redesigned to be even more spacious, with a longer wheelbase and increased cargo capacity.

Today, the Jeep Wagoneer is still known for its impressive cargo area. The latest models feature a power liftgate, a hidden cargo compartment, and a configurable cargo management system that allows you to customize the space to fit your needs.

The Significance of the Jeep Wagoneer's Cargo Area in American Culture

The Jeep Wagoneer's cargo area has played an important role in American culture over the years. For many families, the Wagoneer was the vehicle of choice for road trips and outdoor adventures. Its spacious cargo area made it easy to pack up all the gear and supplies needed for a camping trip or a day at the beach.

The Wagoneer also became a symbol of status and luxury in the 1970s and 1980s. With its wood paneling and plush interior, the Wagoneer was often seen as a status symbol for affluent families. Its cargo area was not just functional, but also a statement of wealth and style.

Today, the Jeep Wagoneer continues to hold a special place in American culture. It is a classic vehicle that represents a bygone era of family road trips and outdoor adventures. Its cargo area remains a key feature that sets it apart from other vehicles and makes it a popular choice for families and outdoor enthusiasts alike.

Comparing the Cargo Area of the Jeep Wagoneer to Other SUVs of its Time

The Jeep Wagoneer was one of the first SUVs to hit the market, and it quickly became a popular choice for families and outdoor enthusiasts alike. One of the key features that set the Wagoneer apart from other vehicles of its time was its spacious cargo area. With up to 76.4 cubic feet of cargo space, the Wagoneer was able to accommodate everything from camping gear to groceries.

Compared to other SUVs of its time, the Wagoneer's cargo area was larger than most. For example, the 1970 Chevrolet Blazer had a cargo area of just 40.5 cubic feet, while the 1970 Ford Bronco had a cargo area of 33.5 cubic feet. Even the 1970 International Harvester Scout, which was known for its ruggedness and off-road capabilities, had a cargo area of just 39.5 cubic feet.

Overall, the Jeep Wagoneer's cargo area was one of its biggest selling points, and it helped to establish the SUV as a versatile and practical vehicle for families and adventurers.

The Future of the Jeep Wagoneer Cargo Area Design: What's Next?

As Jeep prepares to launch the new Wagoneer and Grand Wagoneer models, many are wondering what the future holds for the vehicle's cargo area design. While details are still scarce, it's likely that the new Wagoneer models will feature a more modern and versatile cargo area that can accommodate a wide range of needs.

One possibility is that the new Wagoneer models will feature a split-folding rear seat, which would allow for more flexible cargo arrangements. Another possibility is that the cargo area will be equipped with a power liftgate and adjustable cargo floor, making it easier to load and unload heavy items.

Regardless of the specific design changes, it's clear that Jeep is committed to making the new Wagoneer models as practical and versatile as possible. With its rich history and loyal fan base, the Wagoneer is sure to continue to be a popular choice for families and adventurers for years to come.

Overall, the Jeep Wagoneer cargo area has undergone significant changes throughout its history. From the early days of wood paneling to the modern, sleek designs of today, the cargo area has evolved to meet the needs and preferences of drivers. While some may prefer the classic look of the wood paneling, others appreciate the practicality and functionality of the modern designs. Regardless of personal preference, it is clear that the Jeep Wagoneer cargo area has played an important role in the vehicle's overall success and popularity. As Jeep continues to innovate and improve upon its designs, it will be interesting to see what the future holds for the iconic Jeep Wagoneer cargo area.